Digital tool to find a ‘Smarter Paris’


Paris at night

For generations of overseas travellers, the most common method for sightseeing in a foreign city was a foldable map, a camera and a guide book. But in our increasingly digital world, a tech developer is trying to combine all those tools into one easy package – an app on your smartphone.

Earlier in the year, Smarter Paris was released as a travel tool for iPhone users visiting the City of Lights. Smarter City Guides, a Paris start-up who created the app, launched its first mobile tourist guide to help people better navigate the city.

Although there are many travel apps from more established travel publishers, the creators of Smarter Paris believe their content separates them from the others.

“Established publishers often sell mediocre mobile applications that have proper content but do not make use of the smartphone’s features,” Smart City Guides founder Remi Morlot said in a recent interview. “The newer players offer advanced features, but lack relevant content, or rely on users’ reviews. That’s why we thought that there was room for a guide combining high-tech features with a strong editorial line.”

To create relevant and useful tips, the company has hired a legion of local writers to provide suggestions. Smarter Paris also offers an integrated technology platform. There is geolocation and personalised recommendations. You can create a holiday profile that describes your budget, the members of your travel party, your hobbies and more.

Developers wanted to avoid the traditional platforms based on previous travellers’ opinions. The current app has over 1,000 pages and 1,500 photos of original content.

“And above all, no user ratings. We fully control the content,” Morlot said. “Technology is just a tool to access it as efficiently as possible.”

Paris is the most visited city in the world. Steeped in history, culture and iconic landmarks, it is located in the heart of the country on the Seine River and is a popular stop for French river cruises.

Image Credit: Fabrizio Sciami (flickr.com)