Formula 1 drives into Budapest


Hungarian Grand Prix

For each place it visits through the course of a season, Formula 1 brings the money, the media and the spectacle of high-octane sport. This upcoming weekend, the circuit makes its annual stop in Budapest, and the capital city on the Danube is ready.

The Hungarian Grand Prix – more than just a race on Sunday with lead up events starting before the weekend – will take over the city from 23 July to 26 July. The racing is held at the Hungaroring track, just to the north of Budapest.

Each year, the Formula 1 racers travel to 20 different race locations spanning the globe. In a bit of circuit trivia, racing writer Joe Saward determined in 2012 that the grand prix season covers over 100,000 miles of travelling over 6 continents. He converted that travel into 192 hours of flying from city to city.

Each stop affords race fans a new city to explore. For those already enjoying the pleasure of Budapest whilst on a Europe river cruise along the Danube, they know the city offers so much – from history, to culture, to world-class sport.

“I really enjoy Budapest,” says Finnish driver Kimi Raikkonen to F1 race organisers. “It’s a very beautiful city, with lots to do – lots of clubs and outdoor bars. Many Finns come to the race because there are some historical links between Hungary and Finland, so it’s the closest I get to a home grand prix during the year.”

“If I had a few days to kill,” he said, “I’d take a trip up the Danube and go outside the confines of the city, just to see what the countryside's like.”

A World Heritage site, Budapest is one of the continent’s leading cities, with the Danube bisecting the two halves of the hilly Buda district and the flat region of Pest. Almost 10 million foreign travellers visited last year. 

The Hungaroring race track was built around a natural bowl. Unlike some other courses, most spectators can view more than half of the action no matter where they are situated. There are grandstand and general admission tickets available.

Image Credit: Herwin Thole (flickr.com)